FMDS- Eight-Step Problem Solving

FMDS- Eight-Step Problem Solving

By Brent Moseley, Senior Director of Corporate PE; RJ Robinson, Staff Engineer, Hitachi Automotive Inc.

Why do you think it is important to bring changes to Shop Floor? What are they?

Shop floor plays a predominant role in every manufacturing business, as it is the center of designing and manufacturing—aspects that decide how good the production is. Types of equipment, raw materials, and the labor force are all essential elements of every shop floor, as all three of these form the crucial pillars of the production process. Consequently, managing the shop floor becomes essential to a successful business outcome. When a business owner adopts the right methods to manage the shop floor, profitable returns are inevitable.

What solution do you offer to your clients facing challenges with Shop floor management?

To make shop floor management an easy and straightforward process, we have turned our attention to Floor Management Development System (FMDS). It is a system that develops skills within the middle management group and offers a standardized approach to managing a small segment within a business unit. FMDS enables a shop floor manager to handle minute problems inside the shop floor more efficiently through a structured approach known asthe Eight-Step Problem Solving Method or Process. Such an approach practically reduces unnecessary time and effort spent in filtering requirements on the shop floor. Requirements can include raw materials and types of equipment for a particular product along with other necessities.

"FMDS enables a shop floor manager to handle minute problems inside the shop floor more efficiently through a structured approach known as the Eight-Step Problem Solving Method or Process"

In trying to provide effective shop floor management techniques, FMDS guides the first-level supervisor and middle management of a manufacturing business in practical time management. Besides, we channelize our executive management to look into the floor requirements and ensure a smooth flow of work. If there’s a management development component dedicated to each business unit, then that automatically leads to enhanced growth of the company. We have implemented that idea and witnessing incredible success at the moment. The skillset of employees engaged in the manufacturing process is described by ‘development component’. Employees form the most significant part of any business—it’s their skills and abilities that are going to shape the future of the organization.

What benefits do clients get with the implementation of FMDS?

FMDS applies to problems which are prominent, thereby handling the more significant issues that need immediate attention. We believe management issues must be exposed, rather than hiding it in a way that slows down the process of manufacturing. It’d be easier to get a better and quick flow of work within the shop floor if such a thing is executed. The FMDS board adheres to better visualization of problems in hand in order to come to terms with what we need to do to manage the shop floor problems. Luckily for everyone, the FMDS process is compatible with the visual management scheme of Hitachi, which helps floor managers to instantly address any floor issue. We have seen in the past that this methodology has helped in managing labor efficiencies. Even though requirements vary with different shops, the basic features of visual management are intact within the system.

What is that unique thing about FMDS that you’re trying to put across to the customers?

Through the implementation of visual management, our efforts are directed towards providing each shop floor manager with a platform to track the progress of work. They can keep checks on manufacturing needs as and when required. FMDS delivers the perfect platform for more accessible communication among people engaged in a business unit, thereby helping in better decision-making. Through FMDS, we are trying to convince business owners on how we help catalyze their business decisions. There are certain characteristic features that are hard to ignore in the FMDS board; one such feature is safety. Safety measures generally include watching over the audits, which otherwise can cause damage in the functioning of a business. Other areas of concern for us are tracking quality issues, monitoring labor activities, recording delivery performance, and monitoring open-engineering type projects.

If you could elaborate on the Eight-Step Problem Solving method you’ve been talking about?

Getting back to the Eight-Step Problem Solving method that utilizes analytical intelligence in solving issues within seconds—the first step starts with clarifying the problem in hand, followed by the second step which includes breaking down of problems into smaller sections to get more insight to the problems. To begin with, we must clarify the problem at hand, which is undoubtedly the first step. What comes next in line is the setting of target and prioritizing the goals to get things done within time. Analyzing the problem by finding out the main reason behind it is what defines the fourth step. Appropriate actions or countermeasures are taken up to discard the root-cause, and such measures can be many depending upon the problem. The next step is to look through the countermeasures—what all can be done to rectify mistakes. The seventh step in the problem-solving process is all about monitoring and getting the results handy. Once this is done, we develop or curate a new standard for the business.

A basic understanding of the shop floor needs to be a standard operation. Because, without the resolution of business hindrances, running the manufacturing processes might become a chaotic endeavor. We use the Eight-Step Problem Solving method to systematically attack problems. The process keeps our thoughts and actions on a disciplined path. The uniform problem-solving training principles can handle any scenario in manufacturing. As expected, ourtraining has shown excellent results as to how to be more focused while solving big manufacturing problems.

What kind of leadership strategies do you maintain in your company to motivate employees?

We try to maintain the ‘servant leadership’ tag, where we try and help each other to improve. There’s no one bigger than the other in our organization—which makes all of us equally responsible for every project. As a team, we learn from failures, constantly guide and train to get better and endorse our successes. We try to channelize our leadership in the right way— bringing everyone together to add value to our services. “People do what people see,” this is what we swear by, so we don’t want to put up wrong examples for our teams.

See Also :

Top Shop Floor Management Solution Companies

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Top 10 Shop Floor Management Solution Companies - 2019

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